Tag Archive OM-SoX

ByAndres Kaufmes

Transient Processor

Transient Processor

SKAS symbolic sound processing and analysis/synthesis

Prof. Dr. Marlon Schumacher

Intermediate project by Andres Kaufmes

HfM Karlsruhe – IMWI (Institute for Music Informatics and Musicology)

Winter semester 2022/23

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For this interim project, I worked on the implementation of a transient processor in OpenMusic with the help of the OM-Sox library.
A transient processor (also known as a transient designer or transient shaper) can be used to influence the attack/release behavior of the transients of an audio signal.

The first hardware device presented was the SPL TD4, introduced by SPL in 1998, which was available as a 19″ rack device and is still available today in an advanced version.

Transient Designer from SPL. (c) SPL

Transient Designers are particularly suitable for processing percussive sounds or speech. First, the transients must be isolated from the desired audio signal; this can be done using a compressor, for example. A short attack time “ducks” the transients and the signal can be subtracted from the original. The audio signal can then be processed with further effects in the course of the signal chain.

Transient processor patch. FX chain of the two signal paths (left “Transient”, right “Residual”).

At the top of the patch you can see the audio file to be processed, from which, as just described, the transients are isolated using a compressor and the resulting signal is subtracted from the original. Now two signal paths are created: The isolated transients are processed in the left-hand “chain”, the residual signal in the right-hand one. After both signal paths have been processed with audio effects, they are mixed together, whereby the mixing ratio (dry/wet) of both signal paths can be adjusted as desired. At the end of the signal processing there is a global reverb effect.

“Scope” view of the two signal paths. Sketches of the possible signal path and processing.

Sound examples:

Isolated signal:

Residual signal:

Byadmin

BAD GUY: An acousmatic study

Abstract:

Inspired by the “Infinite Bad Guy” project, and all the very different versions of how some people have fueled their imaginations on that song, I thought maybe I could also experiment with creating a very loose, instrumental cover version of Billie Eilish’s “Bad Guy”.

Supervisor: Prof. Dr. Marlon Schumacher

A study by: Kaspars Jaudzems

Winter semester 2021/22
University of Music, Karlsruhe

To the study:

Originally, I wanted to work with 2 audio files, perform an FFT analysis on the original and “replace” its sound content with content from the second file, based only on the fundamental frequency. However, after doing some tests with a few files, I came to the conclusion that this kind of technique is not as accurate as I would like it to be. So I decided to use a MIDI file as a starting point instead.

Both the first and second versions of my piece only used 4 samples. The MIDI file has 2 channels, so 2 files were randomly selected for each note of each channel. The sample was then sped up or down to match the correct pitch interval and stretched in time to match the note length.

The second version of my piece added some additional stereo effects by pre-generating 20 random pannings for each file. With randomly applied comb filters and amplitude variations, a bit more reverb and human feel was created.

Acoustic study version 1

Acousmatic study version 2

The third version was a much bigger change. Here the notes of both channels are first divided into 4 groups according to pitch. Each group covers approximately one octave in the MIDI file.

Then the first group (lowest notes) is mapped to 5 different kick samples, the second to 6 snares, the third to percussive sounds such as agogo, conga, clap and cowbell and the fourth group to cymbals and hats, using about 20 samples in total. A similar filter and effect chain is used here for stereo enhancement, with the difference that each channel is finely tuned. The 4 resulting audio files are then assigned to the 4 left audio channels, with the lower frequency channels sorted to the center and the higher frequency channels sorted to the sides. The same audio files are used for the other 4 channels, but additional delays are applied to add movement to the multi-channel experience.

Acousmatic study version 3

The 8-channel file was downmixed to 2 channels in 2 versions, one with the OM-SoX downmix function and the other with a Binauralix setup with 8 speakers.

Acousmatic study version 3 – Binauralix render

Extension of the acousmatic study – 3D 5th-order Ambisonics

The idea with this extension was to create a 36-channel creative experience of the same piece, so the starting point was version 3, which only has 8 channels.

Starting point version 3

I wanted to do something simple, but also use the 3D speaker configuration in a creative way to further emphasize the energy and movement that the piece itself had already gained. Of course, the idea of using a signal as a source for modulating 3D movement or energy came to mind. But I had no idea how…

Plugin “ambix_encoder_i8_o5 (8 -> 36 chan)”

While researching the Ambix Ambisonic Plugin (VST) Suite, I came across the plugin “ambix_encoder_i8_o5 (8 -> 36 chan)”. This seemed to fit perfectly due to the matching number of input and output channels. In Ambisonics, space/motion is translated from 2 parameters: Azimuth and Elevation. Energy, on the other hand, can be translated into many parameters, but I found that it is best expressed with the Source Width parameter because it uses the 3D speaker configuration to actually “just” increase or decrease the energy.

Knowing which parameters to modulate, I started experimenting with using different tracks as the source. To be honest, I was very happy that the plugin not only provided very interesting sound results, but also visual feedback in real time. When using both, I focused on having good visual feedback on what was going on in the audio piece as a whole.

Visual feedback – video

Channel 2 as modulation source for azimuth

This helped me to select channel 2 for Azimuth, channel 3 for Source Width and channel 4 for Elevation. If we trace these channels back to the original input midi file, we can see that channel 2 is assigned notes in the range of 110 to 220 Hz, channel 3 notes in the range of 220 to 440 Hz and channel 4 notes in the range of 440 to 20000 Hz. In my opinion, this type of separation worked very well, also because the sub-bass frequencies (e.g. kick) were not modulated and were not needed for this. This meant that the main rhythm of the piece could remain as a separate element without affecting the space or the energy modulations, and I think that somehow held the piece together.

Acousmatic study version 4 – 36 channels, 3D 5th-order Ambisonics – file was too big to upload

Acoustic study version 4 – Binaural render

Byadmin

Spectral Select: An acousmatic 3D audio study

 

 

Abstract:
Spectral Select explores the spectral content of one sample and the amplitude curve of a second sample and unites them in a new musical context. The meditative character of the output created by iteration is both contrasted and structured by louder amplitude peaks.
In a revised version, Spectral Select was spatialized in Ambisonics HOA-5 format.

Supervisor: Prof. Dr. Marlon Schumacher

A study by: Anselm Weber

Winter semester 2021/22
University of Music, Karlsruhe

 


About the study:
In which forms of expression is the connection between frequency and amplitude expressed ? Are both areas intrinsically connected and if so, what could be approaches to redesigning this order?
Such questions have occupied me for some time. That’s why the attempt to redesign them is the core topic of Spectral Select.
I was inspired by AudioSculpt from IRCAM, which we got to know in our course: “Symbolic Sound Processing and Analysis/Synthesis” together with Prof. Dr. Marlon Schumacher and Brandon L. Snyder and which we partially rebuilt.

Spectral Edit works on a similar principle, but instead of having a user work out interesting areas within a spectrum of a sample, it was decided to use a second audio sample. This additional sample (from now on referred to as “amplitude sound” in the course of this article) determines how the first sample (from now on referred to as “spectral sound”) is to be processed by OM-Sox.
To achieve this, two loops are used:
First, individual amplitude peaks are analyzed out of the amplitude sound in the first “peakloop”. This analysis is then used in the heart of the patch, the “choosefreq” loop, to select interesting sub-ranges from the spectral sample. Loud peaks filter narrower bands from higher frequency ranges and form a contrast to weaker peaks, which filter somewhat broader bands from lower frequency ranges.

peakloop – Analysis
choosefreq Loop – Audio Processing


How small the respective iteration steps are affects both the length and the resolution of the overall output. Depending on the sample material, a large number of short grains or fewer but longer subsections can be created. However, both of these parameters can be selected freely and independently of each other.

In the enclosed piece, for example, a relatively high resolution (i.e. an increased number of iteration steps) was chosen in combination with a longer duration of the cut sample. This creates a rather meditative character, whereby no two sections will be 100% identical, as there are constantly minimal changes under the peak amplitudes of the amplitude sound.
The still relatively raw result of this algorithm is the first version of my acousmatic study.

Acousmatic study version 1


The subsequent revision step was primarily aimed at working out the differences between the individual iteration steps more precisely. For this purpose, a series of effects were used, which in turn behave differently depending on the peak amplitude of the amplitude sound. To make this possible, the series of effects was integrated directly into the peak loop.

Acousmatic study version 2


In the third and final revision step, the audio was spatialized to 8 channels.
The individual channels sound into each other and change their position in a clockwise direction. This means that the basic character of the piece remains the same, but it is now also possible to follow the “working through” of the choosefreq loop spatially. To maintain this spatiality, the output was then converted to binaural stereo for the upload using Binauralix.

Acoustic study version 3 – Binaural

 

Spectral Select – Ambisonics

In the course of a further revision, Spectral Select was re-spatialized using the spatialization class “Hoa-Trajectory” from OM-Prisma and converted to the Ambisonics format.
To ensure that this step fits in well conceptually and sonically with the previous edits, the amplitude sound should also play an important role in the spatial position.
The possibilities for spatializing sounds with the help of Open Music and OM Prism are numerous. In the end, it was decided to work with Hoa-Trajectory. Here, the sound source is not bound to a fixed position in space and can be described with a trajectory that is scaled to the total duration of the audio input.

Spatialization with HOA.TRAEJECTORY

 

 

The trajectory is created depending on the amplitude analysis in the previous step.
A simple, three-dimensional circular movement, which spirals downwards, is perturbed with a more complex, two-dimensional curve. The Y-values of the more complex curve correspond to the analyzed amplitude values of the amplitude sound.
Depending on the scaling of the amplitude curve, this results in more or less pronounced deviations in the circular motion. Higher amplitude values therefore ensure more extensive movements in space.

 

 


It is interesting to note that OM-Prisma also takes Doppler effects into account. As a result, it is also audible that at higher amplitude values, more extreme distances to the listening position are covered in the same time. This step therefore has a direct influence on the timbre of the entire piece.
Depending on the scaling of the trajectory, fast movements can be strongly overemphasized, but artifacts can also occur (if the distance is too great).
To get a better impression, 2 different runs of the algorithm with different distances to the listener follow.

 

Version with extreme Doppler effects which can result in artifacts – binaural stereo

Versionwith closer distance and more moderate Dopp ler effects – Binaural Stereo

 

In contrast to the previous sound examples, the spectral sound and amplitude sound have been replaced in this example. This is a longer sound file for analyzing the amplitudes and a less distorted drone as a spectral sound.
The idea behind this project is to experiment with different sound files anyway.
Therefore, the old algorithm has been reworked to offer more flexibility with different sound files:

Revised scalable version of the old algorithm for selecting from the spectral sound

In addition, a randomized selection is now made from the spectral sound on the time axis. As a result, any shaping context should come from the magnitude of the amplitude sound and any timbre should be extracted from the spectral sound.

 

ByVeronika Reutz

Composing in 8 channels with OpenMusic

In this article I present my ideas, creative processes and technical data for the patch programmed for the class “Symbolic Sound Processing and Analysis/Synthesis” with Prof. Marlon Schumacher. The idea of this text is to show the technical solutions for my creative ideas and to share the knowledge gained to help the reader with their ideas. The purpose of this patch is to take sounds from everyday life and transform them into your own composition using several processes within Open Music.

Responsible: Veronika Reutz Drobnić, winter semester 21/22

Introduction, Iteration 1

The initial idea of the piece was to transform everyday sounds, for example the sound of a kettle, into a different, processed sound by implementing technical solutions in Open Music. This patch processes and merges several files into one composition. There are three iterations of the patch that I worked on during the semester. I will describe them in chronological order.

The original idea for the patch came from musique concréte. I wanted to make a 2-minute piece from concrete sounds (not synthesized in Open Music, but recorded). This patch consists of three subpatches that are connected to the maquette in the main patch.

The main patch

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